The Customer Review

 

From the popular blog that brought you The Vas Review comes…

The Customer Review.

Starring….YOU!

Vas Foremost’s resident beer expert needs your help. Craft beer is exploding and now more than ever the shelves are full with new and exciting beers. Sounds like a dream come true right? WRONG! It’s a nightmare! Not in an “elm street” sense but more like a “kid in the candy store that is only allowed 3 pieces of candy” sense. I never did find that golden ticket.

It is impossible for me to try everything that is out there. This is where you come in. Every other week, the Vas Foremost Blog will publish a customer’s review of a beer we have in stock (If this takes off we may move this to every week, not every other week). Unedited and uncut, your words will be featured on our blog for all of the internet to see. It won’t be hidden amongst thousands of other reviews, it will be upfront and center at the top of the page.

How does it work Steve?

First, you buy a beer from Vas Foremost. Next, you review it (and take pictures if you want). Then, you send it to Steve at Steve@vasforemost.com. If you are selected, your beer review will go up on the Vas Blog.

We do have a couple of rules that we ask you abide by:

  1. The beer must be available at Vas Foremost
  2. Keep it clean. No swearing.
  3. Reviews must be more than just a sentence or two long. We really need you to dive deep into this beer so we know what it is like.
  4. It cannot be a beer featured in The Vas Review.
  5. No plagiarizing from review sites. We will check and your review will be deleted.
  6. Submissions limited to two per person per review period.

Finally, BE CREATIVE AND ORIGINAL! We don’t want these reviews to be boring and something you can find on any of the beer review websites. We want these reviews to be distinct and unique.

If you are selected, we will notify you be email. If not, we may pull some highlights from your review so customers still know about a noteworthy beer.

Side note: Feel free to throw your twitter, untappd, instagram, etc. on the review. You scratch our back, we scratch yours. And please make sure that you sign your name at the end. You wrote the review, so you deserve the credit!

The first Customer Review will be published on February 9th. If you have any questions, just ask!

What are you waiting for? Get to reviewing!

Cheers!

Steve

The Vas Review – Holiday and Winter Seasonals Volume 3

A weekly review of Vas Foremost’s craft beer offerings.

All of the major gift-giving holidays are over and I didn’t receive a gift from you…again. I’ve been dropping hints for the past couple of weeks!  Instead of feeling too sorry for myself, I went down to Vas Foremost and found some holiday surprises still on the shelf. In this week’s Vas Review, we take a look at two classic holiday and winter beers. Get them quick before I drink all of them.

A simple, but gorgeous label.

A simple, but gorgeous label.

Brooklyn Winter Ale

Style: Scottish-style Ale

ABV: 6.1%

The story of Brooklyn Brewery is a fascinating one. At one time a hub for breweries, the city of Brooklyn fell victim to prohibition and the great consolidation of breweries in the mid-1900’s leaving not one brewery behind. In the mid-1980’s, a journalist and avid homebrewer named Steve Hindy developed a friendship with his neighbor, Tom Potter. That friendship included a lot of beer drinking (Steve’s homebrews) and a lot of dreaming out loud. In 1988, Steve and Tom realized their dream with Brooklyn Brewery.

Brooklyn Brewery pours out a deep red color showing my reflection in the glass. Its aroma is rich and wonderful, yet it doesn’t want to loan me a couple of bucks. Fruity, bready, and sweet with a touch of caramel and smoke. Who needs hops?

You’ll be greeted by a dominating malty taste as you venture along. Sweet cherry pie filling with a dry biscuit and cracker arrangement. Very subtle complementing smoke flavor and just a spoonful of caramel for depth. At one point, the beer has a distinct dry, grainy taste that leads to a finish of bread crumbs and fruitiness.

Brooklyn Winter Ale is a little bit lighter than most winter beers but should not be overlooked. Mostly because you can see my reflection in it, and I look pretty good tonight in my Winter sweater. Yep, pretty good.

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Railroad christmas tree

Great Lakes Christmas Ale

Style: Winter Warmer

ABV: 7.5%

Cleveland shares a very similar story to Brooklyn. In the late 1870’s, Cleveland was a hotbed for breweries. Prohibition and consolidation took its toll on this city and by the 1980’s, not one brewery was left. To Patrick and Daniel Conway, this was unacceptable. In 1988 they opened what would become Cleveland’s first brewpub and microbrewery, the Great Lakes Brewing company. Today the Great Lakes Brewing Company has grown to become one of the largest craft breweries in the United States.

Great Lakes Christmas Ale is a classic. It is a beautifully copper-colored beer that is perfectly clear. As I look at the beer I can not only see my kitchen right side up, but up-side down. This beer must be a WITCH!

The aroma is full of sweetness and spices. Ginger, honey, and a sweet red licorice. As you really dig in, the cinnamon starts to say hello. The first sip is dangerously addicting as I immediately want another. Bread crumbs sprinkled on a fruitcake with a gingersnap dusted with cinnamon. Warm and with a slightly fuller body, I know why this beer was meant to be drank on Christmas.

Great Lakes Christmas Ale won’t be around much longer. Because I am going to drink it. All of it. And leaving nothing for you.

Merry Christmas, you filthy animal….and a Happy New Year. (Obligatory Home Alone 2 reference).

 

Next time in the Vas Review: Back to the brewery spotlight!

Steve Pasko is a Certified Cicerone® and the Beer Content Writer for Vas Foremost. Follow him on Twitter or Untappd at Gardemybiere. Email him at Gardemybiere@gmail.com or Steve@vasforemost.com

5 Easy Ways to Enhance Your Craft Beer Experience

We all know that guy. He has a beard, a random brewery T-shirt on, and looks over the menu like Santa Claus does his naughty list. When he finally orders a beer, instead of simply drinking the beer, he goes through a “process.”

First, the color must be inspected. He will hold it up to any light that he can get to see what the beer truly looks like. Next, his nose takes a cannonball right into the glass. Leave your table manners at home, folks. This individual doesn’t just take a quick sniff and leave, no. If this were a police line-up where the suspect had to be identified by aroma only, this guy would be the expert.

Finally, after coming up with a nose-full of foam, the bearded wonder takes a drink. Naturally, he doesn’t just take a drink. You would think he was rinsing his mouth out with mouthwash as you watch him take his first sip. The humanity!

Sadly, this guy in the story is me (hence the bearded wonder).

Is there a reason for my madness?!?!

Yes. Yes. Yes. AND YES!

On the surface, we all know it is just beer. It is meant to be enjoyed. It is important to always remember this as it is the thing I stress the most to people I drink with. If you are enjoying what is inside the bottle/glass/can, then who cares?

But if you allow yourself to dig a little bit deeper, you will experience a beverage with the deepest and widest array of flavors on the planet (Sorry wine, but it’s true!).

How do I do this, you ask?

I am glad you asked. People enjoy a good list. Engrave this one in your memory, folks. You’ll thank me on your wedding day…

1) Let your beer warm up for 10 to 15 minutes.

If you are drinking a beer on draft or cask, you can ignore this. Most beers on draft are already being served at the proper temperature (or at least they should be). If you are grabbing a beer out of a cooler or fridge, then let your beer warm up before drinking it.

Cold temperatures lower our perception of flavor, aroma, and body while enhancing bitterness, carbonation, and dryness (the scientific reason why we need to drink macro adjunct lagers ice cold). You will miss out out on a multitude of flavors and aromas if you don’t find the right balance in temperature. Some flavors won’t even make an appearance until the beer is warmer than 40F.

Try this out: take one bottle of beer out of the fridge and leave another in. Pour them out at the same time an hour later and notice the difference. 

2) Pour your beer into a glass

When beer is poured out into a glass, several things happen. The first and most important is that you are able to smell the beer. (Number 3 will explain why that is important.)

The other thing that happens involves the carbonation. When poured out into a glass, some of the carbonation in the beer is released, in turn releasing the aroma of the beer and creating foam (head). Foam is also important because it gives the beer a thicker and smoother texture.

Just remember! Some beer is packaged with yeast. Pour carefully as most prefer the yeast be kept out of their glass.

Try this out: Pour one beer into a glass and leave an identical beer still in the can or bottle. Drink out of the bottle first and note the flavors. Now, drink out of the glass and notice the difference.

3) Smell before you drink

Suggestion number two is closely related to suggestion three.

Ever wonder why food tastes different when you have a cold? It’s because you can’t smell anything and your sense of smell is closely linked to your perception of flavor. Our taste buds on our tongue can only sense five things: sweetness, saltiness, bitterness, sourness, and umami (often referred to as “savoriness”). Meanwhile, our sense of smell can detect about 10,000 different types of aromas.

What we perceive as flavor is a combination of our sense of smell and our sense of taste, with our sense of smell doing most of the heavy lifting.

Try this out: Plug your nose and take a sip of a beer. Note what you taste. Now swallow that beer, release your nose and breathe in. I won’t spoil the ending here but trust me, you’ll be amazed at the difference.

4) Hold it in

If you just guzzle your beer straight down, you are missing out!

Think of beer as a gobstopper with layers and layers of different flavors beyond its surface. If you bite into the gobstopper immediately, you will not only lose a tooth or two, but you will miss out on the other flavors that Mr. Wonka intended for you to have.

When you hold the beer in for just a little bit longer and let it coat the entire inside of your mouth, you’ll notice changes in flavor abound. Different flavors will come out as that liquid hits different parts of your mouth. Additionally, you will be able to discern the beer’s mouthfeel and texture.

Try this out: Take a quick sip of beer and note the flavors. Now, take a drink and hold it in your mouth for five seconds. It’s surprising how much difference just a little time can make.

5) Drink water

We have all heard and said it before, drink water to help stay sober. This is of the upmost importance for alcohol distribution within your body, but in this instance, I am talking about something different.

If you are drinking different beers in a session, cleanse your palate before each beer with some water. This will help settle out your taste buds before your next beer. It is especially important if you are jumping around the spectrum, say an IPA to a belgian beer. If you jump right into that belgian beer after drinking an IPA, those first couple of sips may still have a lingering bitterness from that IPA and give you the wrong impression of the new beer.

Drinking some water in between that will refresh your palate and have you ready for your next adventure in a glass!

Try this out: Drink water in between different beers! Didn’t I just say that?!

BONUS TIP:

This is a little bit more advanced, but trust me when I say it’ll help.

When drinking multiple beers in a session, always go light to strong. Example: Hefeweizen before a dopplebock. Blonde ale before an IPA. Amber ale before a porter or stout.

A stronger beer is packed with intense flavors that can quickly overtake your palate. If you try following up a stronger beer with a lighter beer, the delicate flavors are going to be overwhelmed by what is still lingering from before.

And that is it!

Nothing too hard, right?! Five easy ways to enjoy drinking that craft beer just a little bit more.

Why not give it a try?

 

Steve Pasko is a Certified Cicerone® and the Beer Content Writer for Vas Foremost. Follow him on Twitter or Untappd at Gardemybiere. Email him at Gardemybiere@gmail.com or Steve@vasforemost.com. 

The Vas Review – Spiteful Brewing

A weekly review of Vas Foremost’s craft beer offerings.

Brad Shaffer and Jason Klein have been friends since childhood. They are such good friends that they A) wear half-heart chain necklaces that connect to each other or B) started a brewery together in 2010. In this case, it’s the latter. In this week’s Vas Review, I drink up two beers from another toddler-aged brewery in Chicago, Spiteful Brewing. Cheers!

 

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I lost 5 pounds by switching to the Fat Badger weight loss system!

Fat Badger

Style: Irish Red Ale

ABV: 7.6%

It may not be March, but that doesn’t mean we can’t enjoy what the Irish have to offer. No, I’m not talking about that Irish Dry Stout that starts with a “G” and ends with a “uinness” and that comes to us from Africa (sad, but true). I am talking about the other, lesser known Irish contribution to the beer world – the Irish Red Ale. It’s history is a mystery for the most part but its wonderful taste is undeniable. Leave your gluttony at the door, folks and indulge in Spiteful Brewing’s Fat Badger.

If you quit looking at the wonderful designed label of the literal fat badger, you’ll see a muddily opaque brown ale. Yes, it’s brown and not red. Some beers in this style category will see a red hue, but some won’t.

Before we drink, we take a nose to the aroma. There is a wide range of influence going on here from the west coast of the U.S. to the British Isles. The British brewing influence shows us caramel, toffee, biscuit, and a malty backbone. Unique to this beer, the aroma has a moderately strong hop presence with some pine notes. Typically, you won’t see that in an Irish Red. For the most part in this style, hop aroma and flavors are restrained. (Damn American influence.)

Spoiler alert! The beer tastes nothing like the pizza and hamburger on the label. You find me a man who can make a beer taste like that, and I’ll start signing my paychecks over to him immediately. Fat Badger is a malt party in my mouth. It’s slightly fruity, showing toasted malt notes, toffee, caramel, biscuit, and some breadiness. The hops crash the party and show off a wet pine tree-like flavor. (Wet pine tree…don’t you just love how beer geeks sell the flavors in a beer?) The beer itself is pretty thick and it dries out a little bit on the backend leaving a breaded fruitiness behind.

I lied a little bit in the past paragraph. As it turns out, I don’t want my beer to taste like pizza and hamburgers. I want my beer to taste like this. So let’s all turn a little bit Irish and kiss the first red-head we see.

 

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Nice nose, Marcus.

Jingle Balls

Style: Winter Warmer

ABV: 7.6%

Jingle Balls…enough said. Spiteful Brewing takes aim to warm up our taste buds and tickle our funny bone with their new winter ale. Think the label for Fat Badger was clever? Wait ‘til you see this one. Let the innuendos fly as the holiday cheer lowers our inhibitions. Marcus, show me what you got.

Jingle Balls

Dashing through this beer
Flavors of ginger and nutmeg are clear
Cinnamon bread on the nose
Fruitiness and caramel impose

Some woodiness from the hops
and a cherry put right on top
what fun is it to laugh and drink
a beer from Spiteful Brewing

O!

Jingle Balls
Jingle Balls
A thick mouthfeel that finishes dry
No need to try
the jokes are implied
and better than I could provide

Jingle Balls
Jingle Balls
raise your glasses with a toast
just take a peak
if you want to see
what’s underneath Marcus’s mistletoe.

See you next week!

Additional offerings from Spiteful Brewing available at Vas Foremost include: Time Stealers Molasses Porter, Corporate Guy Wheat, Pigeon Porter, Alley Time Pale Ale, Negative Nancy Imperial Red, GFY Stout, Debbie Downer Dunkelweizen, and In the Weeds Wheat.

 

Steve Pasko is a Certified Cicerone® and the Beer Content Writer for Vas Foremost. Follow him on Twitter or Untappd at Gardemybiere. Email him at Gardemybiere@gmail.com or Steve@vasforemost.com. 

The Vas Review – Lake Effect

A weekly review of Vas Foremost’s craft beer offerings.

Dreams can come true. For Clint Bautz and Lynn Ford, Lake Effect Brewing Company is the realization of a dream. In dog years, this brewery is still a puppy. In this week’s Vas Review I sample two beers from the new brewery on the northwest side of Chicago that everybody is talking about.

 

Lake Effect Snow

Ugh, don't remind me.

Ugh, don’t remind me.

Style: Witbier

ABV: 5.5%

I’ve prepared well for this one. I’ve assembled a couple of extra blankets, some hand warmers, and a 60-pound dog who loves to cuddle. Grab the bottle opener and lift the cap off of Lake Effect Snow. (No, not the dreaded precipitation that causes us to have an impromptu car abandonment party on Lake Shore Drive.) Lake Effect Snow is a Witbier from Chicago’s own Lake Effect Brewery.

Lake Effect Snow (Snow from here on out) pours out the middle of a blizzard, cloudy and temptingly opaque. With my snow pants, gloves and jacket on I push forward into the beer. The aroma makes me forget about the cold with orange citrus, coriander spice, and fresh cut hay from the farm. If that weren’t enough, a slight woodiness from the hops and a touch of lemon and pepper from the yeast have me pulling out my grill thinking my friends are coming over for a summer BBQ.

It’s time to embrace the inevitable and welcome the Snow into my life.

Be prepared for a spicy, peppery and coriander taste upon the first sip. The citrus from the aroma translates into a lemongrass taste with a very gentle bitter orange settling in mid-palette. Into the vocabulary of a beer geek we must go for the next taste – hay. Yes, hay. I’m sure most of us without an older brother have never tasted hay. But we all know what it smells like and could take a guess on to what it tastes like. In this case, the hay flavor is most certainly welcome as it balances the citrus and pepper tastes, lending a drinkable dryness to the beer.

So embrace Lake Effect Snow and have a snowball fight, go sledding or make a snow angel. Just make sure you drink this beer after the festivities, and not during. (After all, spilling beer is one of the seven deadly sins.)

 

Falcon Dive IPA

Rodents beware!

Rodents beware!

Style: American-Style India Pale Ale

ABV: 7.0%

Ah, the American IPA. The most popular and best-selling style of craft beer in the United States. Known for its more pronounced bitterness and flavors of citrus and pine, this style of beer has burrowed its way into our hearts and set up a nest in there. Lake Effect Brewing Company tries its hand at the style with Falcon Dive IPA.

Falcon Dive pours out a copper tangerine hue, proudly showing its feathers. Darting quickly out of the trees is a fruity aroma highlighted by a fresh squeezed orange citrus aroma. Hidden a little bit more in the forrest are some biscuit, toffee and toasted malt aromas.

Squawk! What about the cracker?!

Crackers? Yes, they’re in there. But…aren’t you a falcon?

Interruptions aside, the first thing that hits you in the taste is a mineral-like tingle. Don’t worry – that’s supposed to be there. I’d get into a water chemistry lesson to explain, but wouldn’t we just rather drink the beer at this point? Caged up inside this brew are several distinct flavors: pine, resin, citrus and that biscuit/cracker-malt taste that Polly likes so much. There is a fairly potent bitterness that comes through, especially on the back end. It mellows out on the after taste, leaving behind some melon and toasted malt flavors.

Don’t be afraid to let this bird out of its cage. It’s friendly, doesn’t bite, and could perform some nice tricks (if you drink enough of it). And if you twaut you taw a puddy tat, put some Falcon Dive IPA in a saucer bowl for it. Cats like beer, right?

Another offering from Lake Effect available at Vas Foremost is Cruisin’ for a Brewsin’ .

 

Steve Pasko is a Certified Cicerone® and the Beer Content Writer for Vas Foremost. Follow him on Twitter or Untappd at Gardemybiere. Email him at Gardemybiere@gmail.com.

The Vas Review – Begyle

A weekly review of Vas Foremost’s craft beer offerings.

Begyle Brewing Co. is relatively new to the Chicago beer scene. Started by a trio of friends, Begyle has been unleashing beer to the masses for just over a year. This week we take a look at two of their offerings, Maybe Next Summer and Flannel Pajamas.

Maybe Next Summer

Maybe Next Summer

Maybe Next Summer – Begyle

Style: American Pale Ale

ABV: 6.5%

Smack dab in the middle of Fall (wait, do I see snow outside?) comes Maybe Next Summer from a newer local brewery, Begyle. It’s billed as an american pale ale, expectations are high.

On sight, MNS is solid copper colored ale with good, thick head. Dig your nose right in and you can feel what could be upfront bitterness ahead. Hold your nose in a little longer, citrus and biscuit will greet you. Not to be forgotten, a fresh loaf of bread and some tropical fruit notes make a random appearance.

MNS touches your lips with a fruity sweetness heavy in citrus and passion fruit. All throughout the balance is superb coupled with a light mineral tingle. Some English character malt dances around in there (mostly biscuit and toasted notes). A surprisingly strong caramel character that becomes the dominant taste, especially in the finish. The backend is on the drier side (something I personally prefer), with lasting notes of caramel, toffee, citrus, and peanut brittle. MNS isn’t too thin but it is certainly not too thick. It falls right in the sweet spot.

If you crave balance in your pale ales, this one is for you – just the right amount of hop character balanced against just the right amount of malt character. Maybe Next Summer  is a solid beer and worth a taste. It makes me wonder if maybe I don’t need the summer. After all, my glass is still half full.

 

Flannel Pajamas

Flannel Pajamas - Beglye

Flannel Pajamas – Begyle

Style: Stout

ABV: 5.4%

It only seems fitting that the second beer we look at from Begyle is called Flannel Pajamas. Our first offering had us missing the Summer, while our second offering will surely convince me that its time to take out the Winter wear.

Flannel Pajamas pours out black with whipped 3 Musketeers chocolate-like head. As the true beer geeks we are, a couple of sniffs are on order first. (Eat your heart out, wine.) The nose awakens to roasted malts, chocolate, and some sweet coffee aromas. Next in line is an almost caramel popcorn-like aroma. Afraid and alone, the caramel aroma calls upon a toffee and oat aroma to keep it company.

Enough! Beer is meant to be drunk.

FP starts off like most stouts do with a roasted malt taste. Surprisingly it takes a turn and becomes a little sweet, almost fruity in nature. I am reminded of a Charleston Chew candy as I drink this – chocolate and marshmallows. The caramel popcorn is there again to greet you but not for long. Replacing it is a roasted coffee bean taste with our old friend chocolate. FP finishes fairly dry, although it seems to get increasingly dry as we move along. On the palette lingers a raisiny and plum-like fruitiness hand and hand with roasted malts.

After drinking Flannel Pajamas, I feel a lot warmer. It could be the beer or the fact that I’m sitting next to the heater and it just kicked on. If you don’t like to be assaulted with coffee and roasted malts when you drink a stout, then you need to grab Flannel Pajamas on your way to checkout. Variety is the spice of life after all, and sometimes I just need a beer with it.

Other offerings from Begyle available at Vas Foremost include:  Bushel & a Peck, Farmer’s Hand Midwest IPA, Hophazardly IPA, and Neighborly Stout.

 

Steve Pasko is a Certified Cicerone® and the Beer Content Writer for Vas Foremost. Follow him on Twitter or Untappd at Gardemybiere. Email him at Gardemybiere@gmail.com.

The Meaning of Craft Beer

THE VAS BLOG – INSIGHTS ON THE ART OF DRINKING

  I’ve been writing posts for a while now, and have been referencing plenty of craft brews, but I’ve never actually bothered to explain what a craft brew is, or why this is even a big deal.  While I can probably take it for granted that most of you are into beer enough to know anyway, I don’t want to ignore anyone that doesn’t.  Since the more you understand about beer, the more you’ll want to try it, I consider any opportunity to educate and expose people to beer to be a good thing. 

To begin with some perspective: prior to the 1920’s in theUnited States, there were many small breweries throughout the country.  With the passage of Prohibition, many went out of business because they were unable to sustain themselves.  As a result, the 1930s-1970s were predominated by breweries such as Budweiser and Miller, who’s ubiquitous Pilsner became synonymous with American Beer. 

Fast forward thirty years, and there has been a virtual explosion of breweries throughout the U.S.producing a variety of beers in different styles.  A term that gained a lot of traction starting in the 1990’s was “microbrewery”, and this still gets tossed around a lot in conjunction with craft beers.  This is not entirely accurate.  While a microbrew is a craft beer, a craft beer can be a larger operation than a microbrew.  A microbrewery is defined as producing less than 15,000 barrels a year, while the American Brewers Association, produces and defines a craft brewery as one who has “Annual production of 6 million barrels of beer or less…Less than 25% of the craft brewery is owned or controlled (or equivalent economic interest) by an alcoholic beverage industry member who is not themselves a craft brewer.”  (http://www.brewersassociation.org/pages/business-tools/craft-brewing-statistics/craft-brewer-defined

What this is saying is that a craft brewer must be small (relative to Macrobreweries) and fundamentally independent.  This probably counts for most brewers that are out there, producing relatively small quantities.  Craft breweries run the gamut through, with some small breweries producing a handful to large ones like Boston Beer Co. that put out almost 2,000,000 barrels a year.

That’s a brief technical explanation of a craft beer.  On a more personal level, I’d like to define these beers in a way that is not quantitative.  I’ll leave that to people above my pay grade to parse out in terms of volumes, or percentages owned.  To me, a craft beer is an artisinal product.  It is made with respect for the process of brewing, and, undeniably, a passion for beer.  I think that this is a transparent passion, and it is infectious to many of the people who have been won over by these brews.  This is beer that has moved past getting “slammed” or “shotgunned”, in the same way you don’t swallow down a Filet Mignon like you would a Big Mac. 

I’ll leave it at this point.  If you enjoy these beers even a fraction as much as I do, then you know what I am talking about.  If you are just discovering them, you are in store for a great surprise. 

Have a great weekend, everyone.   As always, if you have any questions about anything I’ve written, or even general questions about anything else, please feel free to email me at george@vasforemost.com, tweet us: @vasforemost, or give us a call at (773) 278-9420.

Super Bowl 2012…

THE VAS BLOG – INSIGHTS ON THE ART OF DRINKING

 George here – January is winding up.  As February approaches, what is arguably the biggest of all American sporting events is on the horizon.  I refer to the Super Bowl, of course.  Ever since football managed to supplant baseball to become America’s national pasttime, the Super Bowl has become a continually bigger deal.  I, for one, will never complain about this.  Whether you intend on watching the game for the contest itself, or just for the commercials, the Super Bowl is a great excuse to spend a Sunday night drinking, eating, and hanging out with friends.  Now, Budweiser is the official beer sponsor of the Super Bowl through 2014, but there are so many options besides this – and since the two teams playing are the New York Giants and the New England Patriots, I’m going to focus on beers from these places.

The Beers

Brooklyn Brewery – A clear choice for the New York representation on this list.  Brooklyn Brewery has a very wide selection in its portfolio, and we are very happy to offer several here at Vas Foremost, including the following: East IPA (6 pack, $9.99), Brooklyn Lager (6 pack, $9.99) and Winter Feast (6 pack, $9.99).

Brewery Ommegang – This Cooperstown, New York brewery specializes in Belgian-style beers, and provides a sophisticated note to typical beer offerings at Super Bowl parties.  We have several of Ommegang’s offerings, including their Abbey Ale (750ml, $9.29), which is a classic Belgian-style abbey ale.

Sam Adams – This one’s a no brainer, with their Boston Lager (6 pack, $8.69, 12 pack, $13.99) being the obvious “New Englang/Boston” beer choice, but Boston Brewing Company has added so much diversity to their offerings as of late that Patriot fans can’t go wrong here…

Among the many Sam Adams offerings, we’re proud to carry: Cream Stout (6 pack, $8.69), Boston Ale (6 pack, $8.69) and the Cherry Wheat (6 pack, $8.69.)  These three only represent a small sample of what’s out there.

Harpoon – Another must-have for the New England set.  Harpoon has made a big name for themselves with their IPA (6 pack, $9.99) and their UFO Hefeweizen (6 pack, $9.99). 

These are only a small sampling of what we have available, so feel free to email me at george@vasforemost.com, tweet us: @vasforemost, or give us a call at (773) 278-9420 if there are any other regional offerings you want to check on, or if you have any other questions in general.

Thanks again! See you all next week!